Various exisiting projects are available from the Franklin lab, see below for exisiting research. We are also open to new research ideas relating to our three core research themes. For such opportunities, contact us to discuss potential projects.

Conservation Physiology

Fish movement physiology and ecological restoration

Up to two (2) PhD positions are available in the area of fish movement physiology and ecological restoration as part of an ARC-Funded Linkage Project with DPI Fisheries (NSW) and NSW Roads and Maritime Services. Man-made instream structures (e.g. dams and road crossings) have contributed to major declines in native fish numbers, with > 6,000 barriers to fish migration occurring in NSW alone. Recognising this, Fisheries NSW led the development of national guidelines for the design and construction of fish friendly road crossings. Unfortunately, these guidelines have little empirical backing. This project will integrate data on the swimming ability of Australian fish species with culvert hydraulic modelling to better understand fish requirements in and around road crossings. These data will be used to develop National recommendations for ‘fish-friendly’ road crossing designs which better integrate the requirements of native fish with the need for cost-effective water management around roads. Supervision will be provided by Professor Craig Franklin and Prof Hubert Chanson (Civil Engineering, UQ).

For more detail on the project, see document (PDF, 80 KB)

To discuss this project further, please contact Professor Craig Franklin

Scholarships and prizes

Ecophysiology

  • Extreme acid tolerance: Overcoming the challenges of life at low pH for amphibians 
  • Skin function during sloughing in amphibians

Conservation Physiology

  • Interactive effects of UV-B and other environmental factors on disease susceptibility in amphibians
  • The relationship between skin sloughing and susceptibility to the amphibian chytrid fungus: a previously overlooked host defence mechanism? 
  • Can rough substrate improve the efficiency of fish swimming performance? Implications for culvert design
  • Experimental evaluation of swimming performance of juvenile fishes: application to fish passage 
  • Quantifying physiological responses of fish to low temperatures - implications for cold water pollution.
  • Coping with climate change: Can diet be used to change the thermal phenotype of 
    aquaculture species?

Biotelemetry

  • Various projects relating to the the movement ecology of marine and freshwater fauna including estuarine crocodiles, saw-tooth sharks, sting rays, large riverine fish etc.

Interest in pursuing an honours project on one of these topics should refer to the Contacts section.

For more information about the UQ honours program, please refer to the School of Biological Sciences site.

Scholarships and prizes

Ecophysiology

  • Frog husbandry and maintenance

Conservation Physiology

  • Fish hisbandry and maintenance
  • Swimming performance and thermal tolerance in fish

Biotelemetry

  • Whale shark identification

Interest in volunteering for the Franklin ECO-lab on one of these topics should refer to the Contacts section.